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Online shopping addiction is a mental illness

The Internet makes shopping at home convenient. However, shopping can be addictive. Experts say online shopping addiction is a mental illness. Researchers from the Hannover Medical School called the illness "Buying Shopping Disorder" (BSD). They say the doctors should recognize it as an illness, not just as one of various "impulse control" disorders. Dr Astrid Müller said: "It really is time to...accumulate further knowledge about BSD on the Internet."

Dr Müller conducted research on 122 patients who had treatment for BSD. She said five per cent of people might suffer from it. Younger people are more likely to develop it, and be more anxious and depressed. People with BSD act unnaturally. They buy expensive things they don't need, keep and never use things they buy, buy things for instant gratification, and end up in debt. BSD can destroy marriages, relationships and mental health.

https://breakingnewsenglish.com/1911/191119-buying-shopping-disorder-4.html

Google

Google isn't staying on defense in the face of a multistate antitrust probe. The search giant has requested a massive trove of documents related to the probe, which would essentially reveal all the information supplied to investigators by Google's biggest rivals and critics. The investigation is being carried out by 50 attorneys general representing 48 states, Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia, and it's being led by the attorney general from Texas. Google previously tried keep the attorney general from releasing confidential information about the company to consultants working on the probe. Critics say Google's latest move is another attempt to strong-arm the process and intimidate possible witnesses.

https://edition.cnn.com/2019/11/19/us/five-things-november-19-trnd/index.htm

Rock band Coldplay not touring to save environment

Coldplay announced it will not go on tour to promote its new album because of the environmental damage it might cause. Rock bands usually accompany a new album release with a world tour. Concert tours are money-spinners and can make more profits than music sales. Coldplay thinks a tour would have a negative impact on the environment. Lead singer Chris Martin said the band wanted any future tours to "have a positive impact" on the environment.

Coldplay is looking at how tours can be more environmentally friendly. Mr Martin wants future tours to be "actively beneficial and care about the environment. He would be disappointed a tour was not carbon neutral. The band's new double album, "Everyday Life," reflects the band's feelings about the environment. Coldplay will put on a one-off concert for their fans in London. All of the money from this will be donated to an environmental charity.

https://breakingnewsenglish.com/1911/191123-concert-tour-4.html

Onion emergency in Bangladesh

Onions are very important in Bangladeshi cuisine. The vegetable is a staple in the country's cooking. However, many people are finding it difficult to buy onions. There is a shortage of them, which means prices have rocketed. Many Bangladeshis simply cannot afford to buy onions. Bangladesh traditionally imports onions from its neighbour India. Recent heavy monsoon rains in India damaged a lot of India's onion harvest. This has made India ban exports to Bangladesh. The price of one kilogram of onions in Bangladeshi markets has risen from US36 cents to around $3.25. This is nearly a ten-fold increase. Bangladesh's opposition party has called for nationwide protests over the record prices.

The onion crisis is so serious that even the Prime Minister has stopped using it in her cooking. Sheikh Hasina Wazed said she is using onion alternatives in her dishes. A limited number of onions are on sale in several Dhaka markets at twice their usual price. Hundreds of people queue for hours to buy just one kilo. A 41-year-old English teacher said: "Even if I have to stand another two hours, I will do that. I can save some money. I have never seen onion prices this high." A Dhaka resident said a lot of people in her neighbourhood have stopped eating onions. She said: "It has been 15 days since I bought one kilo of onion." Many street-food sellers can no longer make their onion-based snacks.

https://breakingnewsenglish.com/1911/191121-onions.html

Scientists warn 'insect apocalypse' is coming

Scientists say that global warming isn't the only serious threat to humans. Another major threat is the falling numbers of insects and the extinction of many species. Scientists say that half of all insects worldwide have been declining since the 1970s. A new warning is that over 40 per cent of insect species could die out in our lifetime. Researchers said the number of insects is decreasing by 2.5 per cent every year. The scientists are calling it an "insect apocalypse". Many species of butterflies, bees and other bugs are now extinct. In the U.K. researchers say 23 bee and wasp species have gone extinct in the past century. Scientists say the apocalypse could trigger, "a catastrophic collapse of Earth's ecosystems".

Scientists say that global warming isn't the only serious threat to humans. Another major threat is the falling numbers of insects and the extinction of many species. Scientists say that half of all insects worldwide have been declining since the 1970s. A new warning is that over 40 per cent of insect species could die out in our lifetime. Researchers said the number of insects is decreasing by 2.5 per cent every year. The scientists are calling it an "insect apocalypse". Many species of butterflies, bees and other bugs are now extinct. In the U.K. researchers say 23 bee and wasp species have gone extinct in the past century. Scientists say the apocalypse could trigger, "a catastrophic collapse of Earth's ecosystems".

https://breakingnewsenglish.com/1911/191117-insect-apocalypse.html

UK election

The first debate in the UK general election was, well, inconclusive, to say the least. Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn faced questions about Brexit, the future of the union and a path forward in a fractured political atmosphere. Corbyn seemed to shirk a lot of Brexit issues, glossing over his party's plan to negotiate a new deal with the EU in favor of criticizing the country's current Conservative rule. Johnson tried to paint Corbyn as a threat to the unity of the four nations of the UK. However, many believe Johnson essentially threw Northern Ireland under the bus during recent Brexit dealings, so it's a bit of a pot-and-kettle situation.

https://edition.cnn.com/2019/11/20/us/five-things-november-20-trnd/index.html

 

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