May 25 – May 31 Weekly News

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Woman wins $1 million Picasso in charity drawing

An Italian lady won a Pablo Picasso painting. She won it in a charity drawing. Her son bought her the ticket for Christmas. The lady found out she was the lucky winner on Wednesday. Her son explained that when he told his mother she had won a Picasso, she said: "Please don't joke." He added: "It was maybe the best decision I've made in my life." His mother could not believe she had won. She said it was "incredible". She added: "I have never won anything before".

The painting is of a newspaper and wine glass on a table. It is called Still Life. Picasso painted it in 1921. The winner was decided in Paris at an auction house. It valued the painting at $1.1 million. The billionaire art collector who gave the painting to the drawing said it was worth up to $3 million. All the money collected in the drawing will help people in Madagascar and Cameroon. An NGO will build and repair wells and toilets in countryside villages.

https://breakingnewsenglish.com/2005/200527-picasso-raffle-1.html

Cuckoo completes epic 12,000km migration

Cuckoo completes epic 12,000km migration

A cuckoo finished one of the longest migrations by a bird. The cuckoo left its winter home in Zambia in March and flew to Mongolia. Scientists named the bird Onon, after a Mongolian river. They micro-chipped five cuckoos last summer to follow their migration and watched the birds across the Indian Ocean and Asia. Onon was the quickest to make the journey from Mongolia to Zambia and back. The scientists called it "a mammoth journey".

The tagging was a joint trial between Mongolian, British and Chinese scientists. They set up a blog called the Mongolia Cuckoo Project for bird lovers to see the birds' progress. Onon arrived home on May the 27th after flying 26,000km. The blog said it was: "Remarkable navigation and endurance." It added: "Onon has no time to waste as he needs to set up his area, defend it from competing males and mate with as many females as possible."

https://breakingnewsenglish.com/2005/200529-cuckoo-4.html

No screaming in Japanese amusement parks

No screaming in Japanese amusement parks

Amusement parks in Japan have guidelines on visitors screaming. Japan's government asked companies to prepare for the "new normal" COVID-19 life. One guideline is no screaming on rollercoasters. Scientists say screaming or shouting increases the amount of virus put into the air. Talking quietly lowers the risk of spreading the virus. The new guidelines say visitors should not talk loudly or scream on all rides.

Japan's amusement parks are slowly reopening. Japan ended its coronavirus emergency this week. Tokyo Disneyland and Universal Studios Japan closed in early March. They have not made a date to reopen. Parks will have rules about masks and social distancing. "Ghosts...in haunted houses should [keep] a healthy distance from their 'victims'". Park staff dressed as mascots and superheroes should not shake hands or high-five anyone.

https://breakingnewsenglish.com/2005/200531-amusement-parks-1.html

Car rental group Hertz ranks for bankruptcy

Car rental group Hertz ranks for bankruptcy

The car rental company Hertz has ranked for bankruptcy protection in the US after falling rentals. Hertz is the world's second-largest car rental company and is a family name. It is one of the highest-profile companies to register for bankruptcy because of COVID-19. It had already furloughed or laid off more than 20,000 of its employees as rentals declined up worldwide. This is about half of its global workforce. The impact of the pandemic on travel demand was sudden and dramatic. Hertz had $18.8 billion of debt on its books as of March the 31st.

Hertz was founded in 1923 when John Hertz of the Yellow Cab and Yellow Truck and Coach Manufacturing Company bought a small car rental company. CNN wrote about how the pandemic has hit Hertz and the entire car rental industry. It said rentals have been "devastated by the fall in travel since the pandemic hit earlier this year". It added: "Nearly two-thirds of its income comes from rentals at airport locations, and air travel has fallen sharply."

https://breakingnewsenglish.com/2005/200525-bankruptcy.html

Death of 14-year-old Iranian girl in so-called 'honor killing' fires outrage

Death of 14-year-old Iranian girl in so-called 'honor killing' fires outrage

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani has called for new protections for women after a 14-year-old girl was allegedly murdered by her father in a so-called "honor killing," causing outrage in the country. Romina Ashrafi's father is suspected of killing her with a farming sickle after she ran away from her family home in northern Iran's Talesh county with a 29-year-old man, the semi-official Fars news agency reported. Police have arrested the teenager's father. 

Amnesty International condemned the killing and called on authorities to ensure full "accountability" for the crime. "We call on Iran's authorities & lawmakers to end the exception for violence against women/girls & criminalize domestic violence. "According to the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, Article 301 reduces punitive measures for fathers involved in so-called "honor killings." Rouhani has expressed "regret" over Ashrafi's death. During a cabinet meeting in Tehran, the President "ordered accelerated study and acceptance" of a bill that protects women against violence.

https://edition.cnn.com/2020/05/28/middleeast/iran-honor-killing-romina-ashrafi-intl/index.html

Another night of chaos and fury as protesters come out despite curfews

Another night of chaos and fury as protesters come out despite curfews

Several cities across the US erupted in war zone-like scenes as crowds defied curfews nearly a week since the death of George Floyd, who spent his last moments bound under an officer's knee, begging for his life. Outraged, hurt, and shouting through masks worn to protect themselves from coronavirus, thousands poured onto streets in demonstrations. While some were peaceful, others ended in chaos and devastation.

Some people launched fireworks and threw bottles at the officers. Others torched buildings, burned police cars, and robbed stores. Police responded with rubber bullets, tear gas and arrests. Mayors from at least 25 cities ordered people off the streets. Some states called in National Guard soldiers by the hundreds to respond to the unrest. As the world watched, the same chant echoed across the US in the fifth day of protest: "No justice, no peace." Americans and public officials have demanded justice against the four officers involved in 46-year-old Floyd's death. All four were fired from the Minneapolis Police Department Tuesday.

https://edition.cnn.com/2020/05/31/us/george-floyd-protests-sunday/index.html

How Vietnam managed to keep its coronavirus death toll at zero

 When the world looked to Asia for successful examples in handling the novel coronavirus outbreak, much attention and applause were paid to South Korea, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. But there's one overlooked success story -- Vietnam. The country of 97 million people has not reported a single coronavirus-related death and on Saturday had just 328 confirmed cases, despite its long border with China. Vietnam is a low-middle income country with a much less-advanced healthcare system than others in the region. It only has 8 doctors for every 10,000 people according to the World Bank.

After a three-week nationwide lockdown, Vietnam lifted social distancing rules in late April. Businesses and schools have reopened, and life is gradually returning to normal. So how has Vietnam seemingly resisted the global trend and largely escaped from the coronavirus? The answer, according to public health experts, lies in a combination of factors, from the government's fast, early response to prevent its spread, to severe contact-tracing and quarantining and effective public communication.

https://edition.cnn.com/2020/05/29/asia/coronavirus-vietnam-intl-hnk/index.html

NASA, SpaceX launch astronauts from US earth for the first time in a decade

NASA, SpaceX launch astronauts from US earth for the first time in a decade

A SpaceX spacecraft carrying two NASA astronauts flew into outer space Saturday. It marked the first time humans have traveled into Earth's orbit from US soil in nearly a decade. Astronauts Robert Behnken, 49, and Douglas Hurley, 53, will spend about 19 hours aboard SpaceX's Crew Dragon capsule as it slowly moves its way toward the International Space Station.

The United States hasn't launched its own astronauts into space since the Space Shuttle Program ended in 2011. Since then, NASA's astronauts have had to travel to Russia and train on the country's Soyuz spacecraft. Those seats have cost NASA as much as $86 million each. The launch also marked the first time in history that a commercial aerospace company has carried humans into Earth's orbit.

Prior to the launch, the space agency's top official, Jim Bridenstine, said he hoped it will inspire wonder and uplift the general public during the ongoing health crisis.

https://edition.cnn.com/2020/05/30/tech/spacex-nasa-launch-astronauts-scn/index.html

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